Comments – “Particulart”

An independent café, where time is slowed and the audience is relaxed, is the ideal location for an encounter with a bunch of knitted chemistry with a message. Here are a few of the comments and tweets we received:

I do like a bit of #knitted art over coffee.

I was drinking my tea at Real Food, when I noticed a knitted particle on the table, then I realised I was surrounded by organic chemistry.

Had a sneak preview. Looks amazing. Do go along and see something you will never have seen before.

I wish I could adequately describe how happy I am that knitted molecular chains are an actual thing.

Diana and I invited the Incinerator’s Liaison Committee to our launch, which led to one of the most positive responses we had to the exhibition. One of the subcontractors told us they were used to attending ‘shouty’ aggressive protests, which did little beyond alienating them. Our gentle protest made him much more interested in engaging, and he liked the potential for educating the public.

Pattern – “A Stitch in Time”

Download this pattern as a pdf

See also the patterns for the atoms and bonds between atoms.

Colours

Hydrogen
Carbon
Oxygen
Nitrogen
Fluorine
Chlorine
Sulphur
White
Black
Red
Sky blue
Light green
Medium green
Deep yellow

Particles

Carbon dioxide

CO2

 

Atoms

1 carbon
2 oxygen

Bonds

4 carbon-oxygen

Nitrous oxide

N2O-1

 

Atoms

2 nitrogen
1 oxygen

Bonds

2 nitrogen
2 nitrogen-oxygen

Alternative version
3 nitrogen
1 nitrogen-oxygen

Water vapour

H2O

 

Atoms

2 hydrogen
1 oxygen

Bonds

2 hydrogen-oxygen

Methane

CH4

 

Atoms

1 carbon
4 hydrogen

Bonds

4 carbon-hydrogen

Tetrafluoromethane (PFC-14)

CF4

 

Atoms

1 carbon
4 fluorine

Bonds

4 carbon-fluorine

Fluoroform (HFC-23)

CHF3

 

Atoms

1 carbon
1 hydrogen
3 fluorine

Bonds

1 carbon-hydrogen
3 carbon-fluorine

Trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11)

CCl3F

 

Atoms

1 carbon
3 chlorine
1 fluorine

Bonds

3 carbon-chlorine
1 carbon-fluorine

1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a)

CH2FCF3

 

Atoms

2 carbon
2 hydrogen
4 fluorine

Bonds

1 carbon
2 carbon-hydrogen
4 carbon-fluorine

Sulphur hexafluoride

SF6

 

Atoms

1 sulphur
6 fluorine

Bonds

6 sulphur-fluorine

Water vapour

H2O

Molar mass 18.01528 g/mol

Water vapour is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, needed for life. Water is constantly cycling through the atmosphere. Its concentration depends on temperature and weather patterns, and varies a lot across the globe and through the year.

Further communications with Devon CC

Diana followed up Devon County Council’s response to our initial letter about Particulart on 21 December 2014 by email:

Just a note to thank you for taking the time to give a thorough response to our letter.

I remain concerned that the long term health impacts aren’t being assessed and I will feed that into the low emissions strategy plan feedback for ECC.

The Government document on the guidance in relation to reducing contractor costs did seem to me to include PPP contracts and I hope the Council can follow that up. How much is the value of the contract with Viridor?

I do hope that DCC will look to introduce a zero waste strategy over the coming years, rather than continuing with these incineration plans.

Perhaps just before Christmas wasn’t the best time to write, and a bit of prodding was required. It elicited the following response on 13 February 2015:

The value of the Exeter Efw contract is around £210 million over the contract term. As you can imagine the investment to build these plants is significant – approx £46 million for the Exeter facility. Hence the contracts for their operation have to be for a longer term duration in order to cover the capital and operational costs.

The County Council working in partnership with its Districts are committed through our Waste & Resource Management Strategy (http://www.devon.gov.uk/dcc_waste_strategy_review.pdf) to manage waste at the top of the waste hierarchy promoting waste reduction, re-use and recycling before recovery and we have high targets to aim for. Devon is still among the top performers nationally for recycling and the opening of the Exeter and Plymouth plants will not affect that. The Efw plants are being used to divert waste away from landfill and recover value from it, not to impact on waste reduction, re-use and recycling.